21.–22.3.2018 eSchools Collaboration in the eRegion Conference – Celje, Slovenia

21.–22.3.2018 eSchools Collaboration in the eRegion Conference – Celje, Slovenia

Time:

Wednesday, March 21, 14:00 – 18:00
19:00 Cultural Event: An Evening Dedicated to Bertold Brecht, National Hall Celje
Thursday, March 22, 9:00 – 15:30

Location:

International School for Social and Business Studies – ISSBS, Celje, Mariborska cesta 7, 3000 Celje, Slovenia

Parking at the International School for Social and Business Studies

There is no registration fee, registration is required, however, at Gricar@FOV.Uni-Mb.si.

English is the working language of the conference.

Suggested hotel accommodation

Hotel Evropa Celje  ⃰  ⃰  ⃰  ⃰

Hotel Celeia Celje   ⃰  ⃰  ⃰

When registering, indicate the conference title to obtain a reduced rate.

Content

Co-organizers
Orientation
Objectives
Program
Conclusions and Recommendations 
Conclusions and Recommendation in Slovene language
Participants
Links

Co-organizers

Grammar School Celje – Center

International School for Social and Business Studies – ISSBS Celje

School Center Velenje

Inter-Municipality Initiative: Cross-border eCollaboration in the eRegion

Orientation

The eSchools Collaboration in the eRegion Conference is a follow-up of the eSchools Collaboration in the Cross-border eRegion Gathering sponsored by the Grammar School Celje – Center on December 5, 2017. It is problem based and action focused, opened to the interlinking with the related networks and associations.

At the threshold of the end of the second decade of the 21st century we are entering the world of all-encompassing digitization and a new, electronically colored world. The modern school puts in the foreground the digitization, creativity, entrepreneurship. But at this moment we cannot speak of major effects, as we still cling to the formalistic way of thinking and patterns. These are only supplemented with material benefits from various projects of the consortia, with mythological fear of digitization, that replaces the teacher of flesh and blood by the robot.

However, we do not exploit the greatest advantage that digitization allows – that education systems open up to a greater extent to the world and to life, including the informal knowledge that nourishes formal knowledge, and vice versa, that the teacher and the student again gain the time in which they enter into direct dialogue. Teachers put creativity still too often equal with art talent, although creativity is basically only the sincere and passionate curiosity, but the role of the mentor is to promote the curiosity with his/her experience and care, and in the digital field to integrate the skills and knowledge of the young into his/her work and ideas.

To the development of Central Europe several routes were important:

  • The Roman Roads connecting Aquileia with Emona and to the east-north (Celeia, Petovia, Vindobona), to the east (Siscia, Singidunum) and to the east-south (Tergeste, Caprea, Parenzium, Pola, Tarsatica, Jadera, Salona);
  • The Amber Road nowadays named New eAmber Road;
  • The Silk Road, nowadays named New eSilk Road;
  • The Southern Railway connecting Vienna-Graz-Maribor-Celje-Ljubljana-Trieste.

In the history, the transport routes were providing opportunities for interactions between people in the regions. Nowadays, the Internet and digitalization can bring together organizations in the towns and regions along the railroads and highways, similarly to how the Southern Railway and the traffic did 170 years ago.

Objectives

Continuous development of the eSchool programs to help the students in the macro region of the neighboring countries, the DanubeAdriatic & Ionian,  Alpine  regions to become an equal member of the global eSociety.

Creating ideas for the joint project proposals to the EU tenders and rethinking of the possible cross-border partners with collaboration and networking.

Investigating how the informatics teaching and the availability of the ICT technologies in the schools at all levels could be exploited for an accelerated eCollaboration of all stakeholders involved: companies, ICT providers, national and local government, nongovernmental organizations.

Contributing to the national and international activities initiated by the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018.

Program

Wednesday, March 21

14:00 – 15:30 Panel eCollaboration Along the Southern Railway

 Chair:

Gregor Deleja, Professor & Headmaster
Grammar School Celje – Center, Slovenia
Gregor.Deleja@GCC.si

Keynote Address: Academy, Robotics, Education
Dr. Tadej Bajd, President
Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts & Professor Emeritus, University of Ljubljana
Predsednik@SAZU.si

Panelists:

eSchools on the Crossroads of the eAmber and eSilk Roads
Dr. Stanislav Raščan, Ambassador, Head, Department of Strategic Planning and Analysis
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Slovenia & Assistant Professor of International Security Policy, Graduate School of Government and European Studies, Kranj & eRegions Think Tank Chairman
Stanislav.Rascan@gov.si

Cultural and Technical Heritage along the Southern Railway – School Case Study on Celje Train Station
Maja Rak, Teacher of art theory, the fundamentals of heritage protection and living culture
Grammar School Celje – Center, Slovenia
Maja.Rak66@gmail.com

Mitja Plevnik, Senior Conservator
Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, Celje Regional Office, Slovenia
Matija.Plevnik@ZVKDS.si

15:30 – 16:00 Break

16:00 – 17:30 Panel eSchools in the Digital Era

Chair:

Dr. Jože Gričar, Professor Emeritus, University of Maribor, Slovenia
Program Coordinator, Inter-Municipality Initiative: Cross-border eCollaboration in the eRegion & Editor, eRegion Portal & Member of Assembly & Member of the Board, Central-European Service for Cross-Border Initiatives (CESCI), Budapest
eSchools Text Joze Gricar
Gricar@FOV.Uni-Mb.si

Panelists:

Educating Digitally Enabled Workforce of the Future
Miha Žerko, Chairman of the Board
SRC sistemske integracije d.o.o. Ljubljana, Slovenia
eSchools Text Miha Zerko
Miha.Zerko@SRC.si

Developing Long-term Strategies for the Society Based on Digitalization 
Dr. Alberto Bartoli, Associate Professor of Computer Engineering & Prorector for ICT
Director, Machine Learning Lab, University of Trieste, Italy
eSchools Text Alberto Bartoli
Bartoli.Alberto@UniTs.it

Projects Supporting eCollaboration of the Schools at All Levels
Dr. Nada Trunk Širca, Professor
International School for Social and Business Studies, Celje, Slovenia & Jean Monnet Chair
conf e-reg NTŠ_contribution_e-collaboration 19 3
Trunk.Nada@gmail.com

19:00 Cultural Event: An Evening Dedicated to Bertold Brecht, National Hall Celje

Thursday, March 22

9:00 – 10:30 Panel Grammar eSchools Collaborating in the eRegion

Chair:

Romana Vogrinčič, Computer Science Teacher
Murska Sobota Grammar School, Slovenia & President, Computer Science Teachers Section, Association for Computer Machinery – ACM Slovenia & Affiliated with K–12 Computer Science Framework
eSchools Text Romana Vogrincic
Romana.Vogrincic@guest.arnes.si

Panelists:

Thinking Coding Project
Klavdija Špur Jereb, Teacher of English Language & Coordinator of International Cooperation
School Center Celje, Secondary School of Chemistry, Electrical Engineering and Computing Engineering, Slovenia
eSchools Text Klavdija Spur Jereb
Klavdija.Spur@SC-Celje.si

Systems for automatic assessment of programming tasks in improving teaching and learning programming languages in Slovenian schools
Mag. Matija Lokar, Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
eSchools Text Matija Lokar
Matija.Lokar@FMF.Uni-Lj.si

Computational thinking in Grammar Schools
Dr. Matej Črepinšek, Institute for Informatics
Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Maribor, Slovenia
Matej.Crepinsek@UM.si

Europe Code Week Experience: Invitation to Joint Actions
Katja K. Ošljak, Europe Code Week Ambassador and Country Coordinator for Slovenia
eSchools Text Katja Osljak
Katja@CodeWeek.si

eCollaboration of the Gymnasiums Founded by the Empress Maria Theresa
Snježana Štranjgar, Professor & Principal
Grammar School Karlovac, Croatia
eSchools Text Snjezana Stranjgar
SStranjgar@gmail.com

10:30 – 11:00 Break

11:00 – 12:30 Panel Higher Education eSchools Collaborating in the eRegion

Chair:

Dr. Irena Lazar, Professor & Dean
Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Slovenia & Vice President, International Association for the History of Glass & Collaborator, UNESCO Chair on Museology and World Heritage
Irena.Lazar@fhs.upr.si

Panelists:

ISSBS collaboration in the Region
Dr. Valerij Dermol, Associate Professor & Vice Dean
International School for Social and Business Studies, Celje, Slovenia
Valerij.Dermol@siol.net

Culture and Heritage – the Basis for Collaboration on all Educational Levels
Dr. Zrinka Mileusnić, Professor & Head, Department of Archaeology and Heritage
Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
eSchools Text Zrinka Mileusnic
Zrinka.Mileusnic@FHS.UPr.si

Classical Antiquity and the Uses for (non)useful Knowledge
Dr. Gregor Pobežin, Head, Institute for Cultural Studies, SRC SAZU, Ljubljana
& Professor, Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
eSchools Text Gregor Pobezin
Gregor.Pobezin@fhs.upr.si

Informatics and Intergenerational Cooperation: the Roles of the Third Age Universities
Mag. Tanja Lesničar, Member, Management Council for Informatics and Intergenerational Cooperation
Andragogic Association – Third Age University Velenje, Slovenia & Former Head, eBusiness Department, Gorenje d.d. Velenje
eSchools Text Tanja Lesnicar
Tanja.Lesnicar@gmail.com

12:30 – 13:30 Refreshment

13:30 – 15:00 Panel eSchools Collaborating with Business in the eRegion

Co-chairs:

Janko Pogorelčnik, Director
School Center Velenje, Slovenia
eSchools Text Janko Pogorelcnik
Janko.Pogorelcnik@SCV.si
Mag. Irena Vodopivec, Director of Human Resource Development and Gorenje Corporate University
Gorenje d.d. Velenje, Slovenia
eSchools Text Irena Vodopivec
Irena.Vodopivec@Gorenje.com

Panelists:

Martin Pivk, Director
Škofja Loka School Centre, Slovenia
Martin.Pivk@SCSL.si

Elido Bandelj, Director
Institute of the Republic of Slovenia for Vocational Education and Training
Elido.Bandelj@CPI.si

Velenje Pattern City: Ecosystem for Education, Research and Development of Innovations
Brigita Kropušek Ranzinger, Director
People’s University Velenje
Brigita@LU-Velenje.si

Computer Programing in Kindergarten
Pia Hudomalj, Educator
Kindergarten Šoštanj, Slovenia & Computer Programing, Velenje, Slovenia
Pia.Hudomalj@gmail.com

Andrej Šmit, Member of the HappyBug Group
& Computer Programing, Velenje, Slovenia
Andrej.Smit@gmail.com

University-Business eCollaboration Networks Development
Dr. Valerij Dermol, Associate Professor & Vice Dean
International School for Social and Business Studies, Celje, Slovenia
Valerij.Dermol@siol.net

15:00 Conference Closing

Conclusions and Recommendations

eSchool is the one in which management devotes special attention to training pupils, or students to use “e” technologies. In the eSchool, they are aware that providing e-knowledge and e-skills will significantly contribute to the employability of their graduates.

In order to speed up the training in question through the exchange of good practices, eCollaboration of eSchools is essential. Experience shows that the combined involvement of IT and English teachers is critically important, as the teacher of these two subjects can help establish an environment in which participants in the use of technology can speak in English. In such an environment, e-participation of teachers of all other subjects can also come to life.

Participation in the technical and humanities field is critically important for shaping the integrity of the young learners. eTechnologies open up new opportunities for the dissemination and deepening of humanistic knowledge. Particular attention should be paid to the study, preservation and development of cultural heritage; this concerns schools at all levels. Promising are the achievements of a number of schools in the field of cultural and industrial heritage.

eSchools – from kindergarten to university for a third age – have a lot in common. How to introduce new eTechnologies is often a similar question in the case of a person who is 7 years old or for a person who is 77. It is therefore important to encourage intergenerational cooperation to make better use of available knowledge and existing equipment and to develop a culture of interpersonal cooperation. eSchools are an important component of the emerging Silver eConomy, for which we have to prepare together.

Computer science experts are increasingly lacking, which is most evident in the most developed countries. With the expected accelerated digitization and robotization of all the processes in which people work and live, the demand for such experts will increase. Schools of all kinds and at all levels should increase the proportion of hours in the field of informatics and computer science as part of their work in the education program. Because only specialized high schools and faculties of computer science will not manage this task.

Thirty years ago, the process of introducing the informatics course into the educational program of secondary and schools  of higher education was initiated with the emergence of personal computers. This course, which is designed to get to know basic and widely used computer programs, has greatly contributed to the spread of awareness about the importance of using computers and the acquisition of skills. Now it’s time for a computer programming course to be introduced in all schools.

Computer programming is the basic course of education. Like the courses language and mathematics. This course develops a procedural thinking (algorithmic thinking) that is becoming critical in the era of digitization, which means the automation of processes and procedures within the processes. When introducing such a course to kindergartens, primary and secondary schools Slovenia is lagging behind. However, there will be an additional discovery of the lack of such teachers, once the realization that the new course is needed is maturing.

Increasing the number of hours for such knowledge in a publicly prescribed educational curriculum is very complex and time-consuming. However, school leaders should not wait for a formal change of the curriculum. On their own initiative, they should introduce additional innovative ways of training in accordance with their own possibilities and requirements of the environment: summer schools, seminars, visits to organizations, inviting teachers / mentors from companies to promote interest and accelerating the opening of cooperation. Communicating with such good practices is an opportunity and an obligation for all those who already have the highest level of experience in computer programming training.

For schools it is generally helpful to connect with organizations in their own environment: with businesses, public administration, NGOs. For training in the field of computer science, this is not only useful but necessary. In organizations, pupils and students can learn about the processes and procedures in which employees use eTechnologies and the problems that are related to it. Only in the most developed organizations can they get to know the latest eTechnologies and become acquainted with their basic characteristics and conditions of use during their studies.

Regarding the cost of providing access to the latest eLearning technologies, it is advisable to set up a joint technology center in the city, municipality or region, which, under certain conditions, would be available to organizations for use. The base can be an existing school center. Such a solution would also be useful for the provision of teachers, as they are already too few, and for their specialization and continuous development.

Global companies are developing their own training academies to train their employees in the specific features of their operations and management. The experience of such academies is interesting for eSchools, so that their general knowledge can be easily transferred to smaller companies through students.

The participation of eSchools and organizations in their environment does not arise solely on their own. Because it is demanding, and it is strategically important for schools and organizations, it has to be carefully organized, complemented and jointly taught together. E-supported solutions are needed to plan and manage the eCooperation process.

From the perspective of space, eLearning involves eSchools in an environment that is consistent with the geographical area from which pupils / students come and where graduates go. It also depends on the ambitions and vision of school’s management, as the level of youth mobility is increasing with the funding of student and teacher exchanges within the relevant EU projects. This can greatly extend the idea of ​​what is an eRegion for an eSchool.

The Internet, which is one single and it is used worldwide, does not know the borders. It is therefore possible and advisable to speed up cross-border eCooperation in the eRegion. For the schools in Slovenia, the neighboring countries and, in general, the countries of Central Europe are particularly interesting for their proximity. Monitoring and exploitation is in the wider field of affairs, for example, the New eSilk Road and the New eAmber Road. Particularly interesting is the Three Seas Initiative: the Baltic, the Adriatic and the Black Sea.

Conclusions and Recommendations in Slovene language

E-šola je tista, v kateri vodstvo namenja posebno pozornost usposabljanju učencev, dijakov ali študentov za izrabljanje »e« tehnologij. V e-šoli se zavedajo, da bodo z zagotavljanjem e-znanj in e-veščin bistveno pripomogli k večji zaposljivosti svojih diplomantov.

Da bi pospešili zadevno usposabljanje z izmenjavanjem dobrih praks, je e-sodelovanje e-šol nujno. Izkušnje kažejo, da je povezano vključevanje učiteljev informatike in angleščine kritično pomembno, saj učitelja teh dveh predmetov lahko pomagata vzpostaviti okolje, v katerem se bodo sodelujoči o uporabi tehnologije lahko pogovarjali v angleškem jeziku. V takem okolju lahko zaživi tudi e-sodelovanje učiteljev vseh drugih predmetov.

Sodelovanje tehničnega in humanističnega področja je kritično pomembno za oblikovanje celostnih osebnosti mladih, ki se šolajo. E-tehnologije odpirajo nove priložnosti razširjanju in poglabljanju humanističnih znanj. Posebno pozornost velja namenjati proučevanju, ohranjanju in razvijanju kulturne dediščine; to pa zadeva šole na vseh ravneh. Obetavni so dosežki vrste šol na področju kulturne in industrijske dediščine.

E-šole – od vrtca do univerze za tretje življenjsko obdobje – imajo veliko skupnega. Kako uvajati nove e-tehnologije, je pogosto podobno vprašanje, če gre za osebo, ki ima 7 let, ali za osebo, ki jih ima 77. Zato velja spodbuditi medgeneracijsko sodelovanje za boljše izrabljanje razpoložljivih znanj in obstoječe opreme ter za razvijanje kulture medčloveškega sodelovanja. E-šole so pomembna sestavina nastajajoče srebrne e-ekonomije (Silver eConomy), za katero se moramo skupaj pripraviti.

Specialistov za računalništvo (computer science) vse bolj manjka, kar je najbolj očitno v najbolj razvitih državah. S pričakovanim pospešenim digitaliziranjem in robotiziranjem vseh procesov, v katerih ljudje delajo in živijo, se bo povpraševanje po tovrstnih strokovnjakih še povečalo. Šole vseh vrst in na vseh ravneh naj bi v okviru svojega delovanja v izobraževalnem programu povečale delež ur za področje informatike in računalništva. Kajti samo specializirane srednje šole in fakultete za računalništvo te naloge ne bodo zmogle.

Povezano s pojavom osebnih računalnikov je bil pred tridesetimi leti sprožen proces uvajanja predmeta informatika v izobraževalni program srednjih in visokih šol. Ta predmet, ki je namenjen spoznavanju temeljnih in splošno uporabnih računalniških programov, je veliko prispeval k širjenju zavesti o pomenu uporabe računalnikov in pridobivanju veščin. Sedaj je prišel čas, da se v vse šole uvede tudi predmet računalniško programiranje (computer programming).

Predmet računalniško programiranje je temeljni predmet izobraževanja. Podobno kot sta predmeta jezik in matematika. Ta predmet razvija postopkovno (algoritmično) mišljenje, ki postaja kritično potrebno v dobi digitalizacije, ki pomeni automatiziranje procesov in postopkov znotraj njih. Pri uvajanju tovrstnega predmeta v vrtce, osnovne in srednje šole Slovenija zaostaja. Obeta pa se še dodatno odkritje pomanjkanja tovrstnih učiteljev, ko bo enkrat vendarle dozorelo spoznanje, da je novi predmet potreben.

Povečevanje števila ur za tovrstna znanja v javno predpisanem izobraževalnem programu je zelo zapleteno in dolgotrajno. Vendar naj vodstva šol ne čakajo na formalno spremembo predmetnikov. Na lastno pobudo naj uvajajo dodatne inovativne načine usposabljanja skladno s svojimi možnostmi in zahtevami okolja: poletne šole, seminarji, obiski organizacij, vabljenje učiteljev/mentorjev iz podjetij za spodbujanje zanimanja in pospešitve odpiranja sodelovanja. Seznanjanje s tovrstnimi dobrimi praksami je priložnost in obveza vseh tistih, ki že imajo največ pokazati pri usposabljanju za računalniško programiranje.

Za šole nasploh je koristno, da se povezujejo z organizacijami v svojem okolju: s podjetji, javno upravo, nevladnimi organizacijami. Za usposabljanje na področju računalništva pa je to ne samo koristno, ampak nujno. Samo v organizacijah učenci, dijaki in študenti lahko spoznajo procese in postopke, v katerih zaposleni uporabljajo e-tehnologije, in probleme, ki so s tem povezani. Samo v najbolj razvitih organizacijah lahko spoznajo najnovejše e-tehnologije in se že v času študija seznanijo z njihovimi temeljnimi značilnostmi in pogoji uporabe.

Glede na stroške zagotavljanja dostopnosti do najnovejših e-tehnologij za učenje je priporočljivo, da v mestu, občini ali regiji vzpostavijo skupni tehnološki center, ki bi bil po določenih pogojih organizacijam na voljo za uporabo. Osnova je lahko obstoječi šolski center. Taka rešitev bi bila smotrna tudi za zagotavljanje učiteljev, saj jih je že sedaj premalo, in za njihovo specializiranje in stalno izpopolnjevanje.

Svetovna podjetja razvijajo lastne izobraževalne akademije, da v njih svoje zaposlene usposabljajo za posebnosti delovanja in vodenja njihovega podjetja. Izkušnje tovrstnih akademij so za e-šole zanimive, da bi njihova posplošena spoznanja lahko prek dijakov in študentov pospešeno prenašale tudi v manjša podjetja.

Sodelovanje e-šol in organizacij v njihovem okolju ne nastane samo od sebe. Ker je zahtevno, za šole in organizacije pa strateško pomembno, ga je potrebno pazljivo organizirati, dopolnjevati in se ob tem skupaj učiti. Potrebne so e-podprte rešitve za načrtovanje in usmerjanje procesa e-sodelovanja.

Z vidika prostora je e-sodelovanje e-šol mišljeno v okolju, ki je skladno z geografskim področjem, iz katerega prihajajo dijaki/študenti in kamor odhajajo diplomanti. Odvisno pa je tudi od ambicij in vizije vodstva šole, saj se stopnja mobilnosti mladih povečuje s financiranjem izmenjav študentov in učiteljev v okviru zadevnih EU projektov. S tem se lahko zelo razširijo predstave o tem, kaj za neko e-šolo sploh je e-regija.

Internet, ki je en sam, saj ga uporabljajo po vsem svetu, ne pozna meja. Zato je mogoče in priporočljivo pospešiti čezmejno e-sodelovanje v e-regiji. Za šole v Sloveniji so zlasti zanimive sosednje države in na sploh države Srednje Evrope zaradi bližine. Spremljati in izrabljati pa velja dogajanja na širšem področju, na primer na eSvilni in eJantarjevi cesti. Posebej zanimiva je pobuda regije treh morij: Baltskega, Jadranskega in Črnega morja.

Participants

 

 

Dr. Tadej Bajd, President
Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts & Professor Emeritus, University of Ljubljana
Predsednik@SAZU.si

Elido Bandelj, Director
Institute of the Republic of Slovenia for Vocational Education and Training
Elido.Bandelj@CPI.si

Dr. Alberto Bartoli, Associate Professor of Computer Engineering & Prorector for ICT
Director, Machine Learning LabUniversity of Trieste, Italy
Bartoli.Alberto@UniTs.it

Mirjam Bizjak, Principal
Grammar School France Prešeren Kranj, Slovenia
Mirjam.Bizjak@GFP.si

Dr. Matej Črepinšek, Institute for Informatics
Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Maribor, Slovenia
Matej.Crepinsek@UM.si

Gregor Deleja, Professor & Headmaster
Grammar School Celje – Center, Slovenia
Gregor.Deleja@GCC.si

Dr. Valerij Dermol, Associate Professor & Vice Dean
International School for Social and Business Studies, Celje, Slovenia
Valerij.Dermol@siol.net

Goran Grašič, Director & Founder
GO TEL d.o.o., Ljubljana, Slovenia
tecaji@go-tel.si

Dr. Jože Gričar, Professor Emeritus, University of Maribor, Slovenia
Program Coordinator, Inter-Municipality Initiative: Cross-border eCollaboration in the eRegion & Editor, eRegion Portal & Member of Assembly & Member of the Board, Central-European Service for Cross-Border Initiatives (CESCI), Budapest
Gricar@FOV.Uni-Mb.si

Slavica Hrastnik, Head, Third Age University
Celje Central Library, Slovenia
Slavica.Hrastnik@Knjiznica-Celje.si

Pia Hudomalj, Educator
Kindergarten Šoštanj, Slovenia & Computer Programing, Velenje, Slovenia
Pia.Hudomalj@gmail.com

Viktor Jemec, Teacher
Grammar School Domžale, Slovenia
ViktorJemec1@gmail.com

Simon Konečnik, Headmaster
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School Center Velenje, Slovenia
Simon.Konecnik@SCV.si

Dr. Jurij Kovač, Professor
Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Maribor, Slovenia
Jure.Kovac@FOV.Uni-Mb.si

Brigita Kropušek Ranzinger, Director
People’s University Velenje
Brigita@LU-Velenje.si

Dr. Irena Lazar, Professor & Dean
Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Slovenia & Vice President, International Association for the History of Glass & Collaborator, UNESCO Chair on Museology and World Heritage
Irena.Lazar@fhs.upr.si

Mag. Tanja Lesničar, Member, Management Council for Informatics and Intergenerational Cooperation
Andragogic Association – Third Age University Velenje, Slovenia & Former Head, eBusiness Department, Gorenje d.d. Velenje
Tanja.Lesnicar@gmail.com

Dr. Matija Lokar, Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Matija.Lokar@FMF.Uni-Lj.si

Mag. Jasmina Mihelak Zupančič, Principal-Director
School Centre Slovenske Konjice-Zreče, Slovenia
Jasmina.Mihelak-Zupancic@guest.arnes.si

Dr. Zrinka Mileusnić, Professor & Head, Department of Archaeology and Heritage
Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
Zrinka.Mileusnic@FHS.UPr.si

Katja K. OšljakEurope Code Week Ambassador and Country Coordinator for Slovenia
Katja@CodeWeek.si

Martin Pivk, Director
Škofja Loka School Centre, Slovenia
Martin.Pivk@SCSL.si

Denis Plavetić, Professor of English Language & History
Grammar School Karlovac, Croatia
Denis.Plavetic@gmail.com

Mitja Plevnik, Senior Conservator
Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, Celje Regional Office, Slovenia
Matija.Plevnik@ZVKDS.si

Dr. Gregor Pobežin, Head, Institute for Cultural Studies, SRC SAZU, Ljubljana 
& Professor, Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
Gregor.Pobezin@fhs.upr.si

Janko Pogorelčnik, Director
School Center Velenje, Slovenia
Janko.Pogorelcnik@SCV.si

Maja Rak, Teacher of art theory, the fundamentals of heritage protection and living culture
Grammar School Celje – Center, Slovenia
Maja.Rak66@gmail.com

Dr. Stanislav Raščan, Ambassador, Head, Department of Strategic Planning and Analysis
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Slovenia & Assistant Professor of International Security Policy, Graduate School of Government and European Studies, Kranj & eRegions Think Tank Chairman
Stanislav.Rascan@gov.si

Dr. Katarina Rojko, Assistant Professor & Vice Dean for Education
Faculty of Information Sciences in Novo mesto, Slovenia
Katarina.Rojko@FIS.UNm.si

Andrej Šmit, Member of the HappyBug Group
Computer Programing, Velenje, Slovenia
Andrej.Smit@gmail.com

Klavdija Špur Jereb, Teacher of English Language & Coordinator of International Cooperation
School Center Celje, Secondary School of Chemistry, Electrical Engineering and Computing Engineering, Slovenia
Klavdija.Spur@SC-Celje.si

Snježana Štranjgar, Professor & Principal
Grammar School Karlovac, Croatia
SStranjgar@gmail.com

Dr. Nada Trunk Širca, Professor
International School for Social and Business Studies, Celje, Slovenia & Jean Monnet Chair
Trunk.Nada@gmail.com

Aleksander Verhovšek, Principal
Third Basic School Celje, Slovenia
Aleksander.Verhovsek@3OS-Celje.si

Tomislav Viher, Informatics Teacher
School Center Celje, Grammar School Lava, Slovenia
Tomi.Viher@sc-celje.si

Mag. Irena Vodopivec, Director of Human Resource Development and Gorenje Corporate University
Gorenje d.d. Velenje, Slovenia
eSchools Text Irena Vodopivec
Irena.Vodopivec@Gorenje.com

Romana Vogrinčič, Computer Science Teacher
Murska Sobota Grammar School, Slovenia & President, Computer Science Teachers Section, Association for Computer Machinery – ACM Slovenia & Affiliated with K–12 Computer Science Framework
Romana.Vogrincic@guest.arnes.si

Miha Žerko, Chairman of the Board
SRC sistemske integracije d.o.o. Ljubljana, Slovenia
Miha.Zerko@SRC.si

Dr. Slobodan Živkucin, Professor & Deputy Director
College for Management & Business Communications – MPK, Sremski Karlovci, Serbia
SlobodanZivkucin@gmail.com

To be updated.

Links

Support for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Australian Government, Department of Education and Training, March 9. 2018
See also: Optimising STEM industry-school partnerships: Inspiring Australia’s next generation – Issues paper, December 14, 2017, pp 55

UAE offers to train 1 million Arabs in computer coding. The One Million Arab Coders initiative, managed by the Dubai Future Foundation. GulfNews.com, March 4, 2018

Support for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Australian Government, Department of Education and Training, February 12, 2018

8 learning trends in 2018. By Akseli Huhtanen, Head of Program, ​Dare to Learn, 8/2/2018

Digital skills for the future. The new, national Institute of Coding will train the next generation of digital specialists. By Melanie Redwood, Policy Adviser (Skills). Higher Education Funding Council for England – HEFCE, 01 February 2018

‘Coding’ in School? Research Needed So Computing Accessible to All Children. By Dr. Sue Sentance, Senior Lecturer in Computer Science Education, School of Education, Communication and Society, King’s College London. Social Science Space, January 24, 2018

Coding as a Playground. Programming and Computational Thinking in the Early Childhood Classroom. By Dr. Marina Umaschi Bers, Professor, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, Department of Computer Science, Tufts University & Head, Developmental Technologies Research Group. Routledge, January 24, 2018, pp 184
Also: Why Kids Should Code. By Marina Umaschi Bers. TuftsNow, September 29, 2017

Activation of Computer Science Teachers in SloveniaBy Andrej Brodnik, Matija Lokar, Nataša Mori. Springer Link, 21 January 2018

Apple still wants to teach the world to code. Apple continues to drive forward in its attempt to teach people how to develop with Swift with a massive European expansion of its Everyone Can Code Scheme. By Jonny Evans. Computerworld, Jan 19, 2018

Digital technology must empower workers, not alienate them. Coding alone will not prepare workers for our tech-filled future. By Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google. Recode,  Jan 18, 2018

Digital Education Action Plan. Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, Brussels, 17.1.2018, pp 11

The Nordic Approach to Introducing Computational Thinking and Programming in Compulsory Education. By Stefania Bocconi, Augusto Chioccariello, Jeffrey Earp. National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Educational Technology (CNR-ITD), Genova, Jan 17, 2018, pp 42

Coding the way to a brighter future in 2018 & beyond. Microsoft News Center, Digital Skills. January 15, 2018

20 Quotes That Will Inspire You To Learn To Code In 2018. By Christopher Watkins. Udacity, Mountain View, CA, January 11, 2018

The Future of Universities in a Digital Era. By Dr. Lino Guzzella, Professor & President, ETH Zurich; Dr. Gerd Folkers, Professor, ETH Zurich, Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences. Diplomatic Courier – A Global Affairs Media Network, January 9, 2018

Computer science students help diversify growing STEM field. By April Hunt. Emory Report, Jan. 7, 2018

Learning Computer Science Is Different Than Learning Other STEM Disciplines. By Dr. Mark Guzdial, Professor, School of Interactive Computing, College of Computing/GVU, Georgia Institute of Technology. Communications of the ACM, January 5, 2018

Minister Bruton announces Leaving Certificate Computer Science subject. Government of Ireland, Department of Education and Skills, Dublin, 04 January, 2018

600 Free Online Programming & Computer Science Courses You Can Start in January. By Dhawal Shah, Founder of www.class-central.com. freeCodeCamp, Jan 2, 2018

High School Computer Science (Math) and Programming Workshop. Learn Computer Science and Programming with Snap!, By Dr. Hesam Samimi, Programming Teacher, App Developer, Language Designer, Udemy, Dec 26, 2017

Best Programming Language to Learn: The Top 10 Programming Languages To Learn In 2018. By John Sonmez, founder of Simple Programmer, December 14, 2017

Educating our youth to care about each other and the world. By Andreas Schleicher, Director, Directorate for Education and Skills, OECD. December 12, 2017

Pimentel wants computer programming taught to elementary pupils. By Faye Orellana. The Philippine Daily Inquirer, December 06, 2017

Infosys Foundation USA to Host Free Computer Science Training for over 800 Public School Teachers in Summer 2018. Professional Development in Computer Science and Maker Education for K-12 Teachers from across the United States. Infosys Foundation, Palo Alto CA, Dec 05, 2017

4 exciting trends that will define the 2018 education industry. By Dr. Ricky Ye, Founder & CEO, DFRobot, Shanghai, China. eSchool News, November 30th, 2017

Grow With Google. Free training, tools, and events to help you grow your skills, career, or business.

Global Education Summit 2017 Ushers in the New Era of Future Global Education. Beijing. Cision, Nov. 29, 2017

A look inside 2017 Europe Code Week. Google in Europe, November 27, 2017

Teaching China’s next generation to express themselves in code. Microsoft News Center, November 22, 2017

How IT directors can promote computer programming in low-income school districts. By Bob Hand. EdScoop – bringing education technology leaders the latest news and insights on how technology is reshaping the education landscape, Washington, DC, November 21, 2017

First OECD PISA report on collaborative problem-solving. OECD, Paris Cedex 16, France, 21 November 2017

Report: Rural schools outpace urban, suburban peers in access to technology. By Richard W. Walker. EdScoop, Washington, DC, November 16, 2017

After the reboot: computing education in UK schools. The Royal Society, 10 November 2017, pp 60

Kindergarten coding: Schools teach tech skills at all levels. Learning computer programming in early grades helps students build problem-solving skills, embrace STEM careers, educators say. Newsday, Long Island, November 5, 2017

Higher Education, Digital Divides, and a Balkanized Internet. By Bryan Alexander, futurist and writer. EDUCAUSE – a higher education technology association, Louisville, CO, USA, Monday, October 23, 2017

E-Language: Asking the Big Questions Around Online Learning. ICDE World Conference on Online Learning, Toronto, Canada, 16-19 October 2017. Mark Pegrum’s Conference Blog

The Academy of Finland funded new ICT Projects. Aalto University Helsinki, 12.10.2017

Celebrate creating with code! Digital Single Market, European Commission, 6 October 2017

Schools and the Future of Work: 10 Research Reports You Need to See. By Benjamin Herold, reporter. Education Week, October 6, 2017

Are schools making the most of digital technologies? European Commission, Directorate-General for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport. October 2, 2017

Filling the pipeline for computer science teachers. By Zahra Ahmad. Science/AAAS – American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC, Oct. 2, 2017

President Donald Trump and his daughter Ivanka are unveiling a new federal computer science initiative with major tech backers. Plus, tech giants like Amazon, Facebook and Google will commit new support to coding education. By Tony Romm. Recode, Sep 25, 2017

Some People Learn to Code in Their 60s, 70s or 80s. By Vivian Marino. The New York Times, Sept. 22, 2017

4 reasons data is crucial for personalized learning. By Laura Ascione, Managing Editor. eSchool News, Content Services, September 21st, 2017

Working Group on Education: Digital skills for life and work. Broadband Commission Working Group on Education, under the auspices of the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development. UNESCO, September 17, 2017, pp 128

Education and Training Monitor 2017. Country analysis. European Commission, Directorate-General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture, 15 September 2017, pp 315

Perspectives: Teaching chemists to code. Providing undergraduate chemistry majors with computer programming skills can make them more efficient and effective scientists. By Dr. Charles J. Weiss, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Wabash College. American Chemical Society, c&en – Chemical & Engineering News, Volume 95 Issue 35, pp. 30-31, September 4, 2017

Teaching coding in Canadian schools: How do the provinces measure up? By Alyssa Julie, Digital Content Coordinator. Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc., Canada. August 24, 2017

How the digital revolution is changing education. By Eszter Salamon, President, European Parents Association, Brussels. The London School of Economics and Political Science, Parenting for the future, Aug 23, 2017

Expert: We Need to Change How We Teach STEM Subjects to Young People. By Kristin Houser, Senior Editor & Karla Lant, Freelance Writer and Editor. Futurism, Aug 18, 2017

The big lesson from the world’s best school system? Trust your teachers. By John Hart, Lead teacher for digital learning, European School of Helsinki. TheGuardian, 9 August 2017

Recognizing value of educational collaboration between high schools and universities facilitated by modern ICT. By K. Zieliński, Ł. Czekierda, F. Malawski, R. Straś and S. Zieliński, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 33: 633–648. Wiley Online Library, 4 AUG 2017

Work-based learning for open professional collaboration. By Dr. Estela Daukšienė, President, Lithuanian Association of Distance and e-Learning (LieDM association) &  project manager and researcher. Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe –  EPALE Österreich, 01/08/2017

Technology is transforming what happens when a child goes to school. The Economist, Jul 22nd 2017

Why coding needs a stronger emphasis in every school. By Cindy Wallace, District STEM Coordinator/ Technology Integration Specialist/ ACT Math Prep. eSchoolNews, July 17th, 2017

Informing Progress: Insights on Personalized Learning Implementation and Effects. By Dr. Pane, John F., Distinguished Chair in Education Innovation & Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School, Senior Scientist; Elizabeth D. Steiner, Senior Policy Analyst; Matthew D. Baird, Economist; Dr. Laura S. Hamilton, Associate Director, RAND Education, Senior Behavioral Scientist & Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School; Joseph D. Pane, Statistical Analyst. RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, July 10, 2017, pp 59

New Zealand Could Require Students to Learn to Code. By Angelica Cabral. Slate – daily magazine on the web, New York, USA, June 29 2017

How do you create a digital university? By Sarah Knight, Head, Change student experience. Jisc, UK higher education digital technology agency. 29 Jun 2017

How Silicon Valley Pushed Coding Into American Classrooms. By Natasha Singer. The New York Times, June 27, 2017

Digital Inclusion: Developing Digital Skills. Ministerial Meeting, Isle of Man. British-Irish Council, 23 June 2017

Italy: Digital school year one evaluation. Cedefop – European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Jun 14, 2017

Students learn through Coding in Central Asia. The Aga Khan School, Osh, Kyrgyzstan, 08 June 2017

How to Prepare the Next Generation for Jobs in the AI Economy. By David Kosbie, Associate Teaching Professor; Andrew W. Moore, Dean; Mark Stehlik, Assistant Dean for Outreach, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University. Harvard Business Review, June 05, 2017

Older Adults Learning Computer Programming: Motivations, Frustrations, and Design Opportunities. By Philip J. Guo, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego. pp 14
See also: How Adults Ages 60+ Are Learning to Code. Communications of the ACM, Vol. 60 No. 8, pp 10-11, May 15, 2017

The Future of Jobs and Jobs Training. By Lee Rainie, Director, Internet and Technology & Janna Anderson. Pew Research Center, Internet & Technology, May 3, 2017

The Power Of Visuals In E-Learning. By Brigg Patten. D!gitalist Magazine by SAP, 2-May-2017

Teaching programming outside computer science departments. By Dr. Cyril Pernet, University of Edinburgh, Dr. Krishna Kumar, University of Cambridge, Dr. Laurence Billingham, British Geological Survey. Software Sustainability Institute, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 13 April 2017

Public Universities Get an Education in Private Industry. Can academic researchers remain impartial if they are beholden to corporate money? By Molly Mccluskey. The Atlantic, Apr 3, 2017

Computer science (CS) in the compulsory education curriculum: Implications for future research. By Don Passey, Professor, Lancaster University. Springer US, Education and Information Technologies, March 2017, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 421–443

High-Tech Leadership Skills for Europe. Final Report prepared to the European Commission, Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. Editors: Werner B. Korte, Tobias Hüsing and Eriona Dashja, empirica GmbH. March 2017, pp 132

Computational Thinking for Teacher Education. By Aman Yadav, Associate Professor, College of Education & Director, Masters of Arts in Educational Technology Program, Michigan State University; Chris Stephenson, Head of Computer Science Education Strategy at Google; Hai Hong, Lead, K-12 Education U.S. Outreach team at Google, Mountain View, CA. Communications of the ACM, Vol. 60 No. 4, pp 55-62, Mar 24, 2017

NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition. Prepared by  New Media Consortium – NMC, Austin, TX, USA in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur; Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB), ETH, Library; Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). March 24th, 2017, pp 60

New Forms of Economies: Sharing Economy, Collaborative Consumption, Peer-to-Peer Economy. By Dr. Daniela Selloni, Researcher, Politecnico di Milano, School of Design. Springer, CoDesign for Public-Interest Services, 21 March 2017, pp 15-26

Next Generation Internet Initiative – Consultation. Final report. By David Overton. European Commission, Futurium. 06/03/2017, pp 158

ICT Report for 2016. European Schools, Office of the Secretary-General, ICT and Statistics Unit, Brussels. 4-6 March 2017, pp 48

Six significant challenges for technology in higher education in 2017. What will hold back the use of technology in higher education over the next five years? By John Elmes, research reporter. Times Higher Education, February 16, 2017

Take a Good Look at the Future of Corporate UniversitiesThere are four things corporate universities can do to avoid becoming irrelevant in the digital age. By Annick Renaud-Coulon, Chairman, Global CCU Ltd. Chief Learning Officer – CLO Media, February 2, 2017

Digital skills in the EU labour market. In-Depth Analysis. Author: Monika Kiss, Members’ Research Service. European Parliamentary Research Service – EPRS, January 2017, pp 22

Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education: 2017 National Education Technology Plan Update. Office of Educational Technology, U.S. Department of Education, January 2017, pp 106

Ready to Code: Connecting Youth to CS Opportunity through Libraries. By Linda Braun and Marijke Visser. American Library Association (ALA), Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP), January 5, 2017, pp 40

2017 NMC Technology Outlook for Nordic Schools. A Horizon Project Regional Report. By Adams Becker, S., Cummins, M., Freeman, A., and Rose, K. The New Media Consortium and The Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education. January 1, 2017, pp 30

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